Stober Group

This is the look of a 14-storey development proposal for a 4.4 acre site between Lakeshore Road and Watt Road in Kelowna's South Pandosy neighborhood being advanced by Stober Group. The company has submitted a rezoning application to the city and is asking for public comment.

 

A 14-storey housing and commercial development is proposed for the South Pandosy neighbourhood just north of Boyce-Gyro Beach Park.

More than 320 homes, new retail space, and some work-live units are planned for a 4.4 acre site bounded by Lakeshore Road, Watt Road, and Lanfranco Road.

Stober Group, a Kelowna-based development firm, has submitted a rezoning application to the city for the property 

The company on Monday released a 12-minute video touting the project and is asking for online public feedback because COVID-19 restrictions preclude the holding of traditional public information sessions.

Original rezoning plans submitted to the city showed last year 450 homes and a tower of approximately 15 storeys. The revised project described in Monday's release indicates "over 320 homes", and a 14-storey tower.

"The Gyro-Beach Kelowna South neighbourhood is a central, vibrant, vital and popular place. It's walkable, it's cyclable, and it attracts people from all over Kelowna," Stober representative Mary LaPointe says in the release. "It's everybody's neighbourhood."

By soliciting public input in an online way, LaPointe says, the company hopes to get feedback from a wider variety of people than those who live near the proposed development site.

"The virtual open house will allow us to reach more people and get feedback from a larger proportion of the community," she says. There is currently no date for when city council will consider the necessary rezoning.

The video overview of the project is at https:www.3340lakeshore.ca

Features are said to include

- massing that abuts Lakeshore Road, with scaled-down terraces toward Watt Road and Okanagan Lake

- the use of an aesthetically-pleasing array of building materials including timber, brick, glass, concrete, and steel

- restoration of a section of Fascieux Creek, currently channelized, to a more natural state

- an overall feel of an "urban village", in the words of architect Jim Meiklejohn, that provides attractive and desirable residential and shopping amenities while still fitting in with the neighbourhood