Helicopter rides must avoid condos

Dear Editor:

Congratulations to another successful Westside Daze fair. However,the helicopter tours drove me nuts.

They fly directly over our condo complex with little regard to the impact they have on the people on the ground.

Are they following Transport Canada regulations as they appear to fly too low, go too slow and hover over populated areas?

The noise is incredibly irritating. People are unable to enjoy their private space due to the blade and engine noise.

It’s a wonderful event but the producers, pilots and helicopter administration need to assure pilots are following flight procedures and respect the residents on the ground.

Respect the people on the ground. Use flight corridors that do not fly directly over residential properties. The noise and intrusion is relentless. A quiet afternoon has been ruined for another fair year.

Patrick Olenick

West Kelowna

Kamloops resident praises our hospital

Dear Editor:

Having just spent some time in your hospital, as a refugee from Kamloops, I would like to say thank you to the ambulance staff, nurses and doctors I saw.

You were all so wonderful and your smiling faces meant so much. You have a lovely facility there and it’s no wonder you all smile so much. Who wouldn’t be happy working there.

Again thank you all. You guys rock.

Have a great summer.

Elizabeth Picton

Kamloops

Media promoting left-wing agenda

Dear Editor:

Kudos to William Kuznia for his letter “Biased reporting on U.S. president” (Courier, July 10).

It used to be that we would glance cynically at the tabloid headlines as we waited to pay for our groceries. Now our mainstream media too sounds like a gossip sheet, and worse, has abandoned truth and seeks to manipulate us with fake news to gain their political left-wing agenda.

They have the temerity to speak on your behalf and mine. Not so! 

Dig deeply and research; the kind of reporting — and censorship — that is done now would not have passed muster even a few years ago.

 Jan Schredl

Kelowna                                          

Rutland’s wet facility is alarming

Dear Editor:                                            

Unlike other writers, I was not born and raised in Rutland. However, 70 years ago, my grandparents had a farm here which I visited regularly.

It was a formative part of my childhood, helped develop my character and provided innumerable happy memories of Kelowna, in general. It has always been the heart of Kelowna to me.

Since moving back here to stay, I have found that Kelowna decision makers seem to have forgotten that it was John Rutland who brought irrigation to this semi-arid valley, creating the orchards which support the economy. 

A stable, prosperous future is not built by tearing down our history.

If we don’t build on our history, our foundations will crumble.

What I’ve been hearing from those who were born and raised here is a profound disappointment in the choices and judgment of the policy makers.

Leaving aside the troublesome issues of building highrises where water is limited and only one road crosses the bridge, the straw that broke the camel’s back was this alarming concept of a wet facility in Rutland.

I believe in second chances and in rehabilitation.

But, I don’t believe that a residential area with multiple schools is a suitable location for a facility which allows individuals with addiction issues to continue taking substances.

This community has much to share with decision makers, if they cared to listen.

Jewel Dhuru 

Kelowna

Translating words of Andrew Scheer

Dear Editor:                       

According to brainyquote.com, Andrew Scheer made the following statements.

For your enlightenment, I have attempted to interpret the messages behind the political spin.

Scheer said, “Some people say I smile too much.”

Translation: He doesn’t realize his supercilious smiling makes him look foolish, but instead believes it makes him look coolish.

Scheer said, “The Conservative party under my leadership will continue to be an inclusive, welcoming party that welcomes not only immigrants but also refugees and ensures that Canada plays its role in welcoming people from difficult situations.” 

Translation: He will welcome right-wing Conservative radicals from the eight corners of the world. (He recently rejected the idea that the world is flat and now believes it an eight-cornered cube.)

Scheer said, “I’ve always believed we can attract a lot more Canadians to the conservative party by explaining and communicating our policies in a more positive way.”

Translation: He has concluded BS is the key to power.

Scheer said, “I’m not terribly science-y. I couldn’t tell you what’s the binomial equation or how many atoms in a mole.”

Translation: He doesn’t understand the real world and doesn’t want to learn. That’s why he went into politics.

Scheer said, “I support the need for Canada to play a significant role in reducing global emissions.”

Translation: Because carbon is widely used to filter pollutants out of water, he believes pulverized coal could be added to gasoline to filter out harmful vehicle exhaust emissions, including carbon dioxide.”

Lloyd Atkins

Vernon

A question to all those who smoke

Dear Editor:

If people care so little for their own body by damaging it by smoking cigarettes, how can we expect those same people to take care of the body of the Earth?

Lia Fraser

Victoria

Unplanned movie is wildly popular

Dear Editor:

Yesterday I went to Landmark Grande 10 Theatre in Kelowna. I heard they were screening a movie for one week beginning July 12, only to be told that “Unplanned” had been cancelled and I would have to buy tickets through Right to Life organization, who were doing "theatre buy-outs."

But last night, friends were locked off that site for the third time because the tickets sold out in just four minutes. This is crazy. Right to Life is not set up to sell tickets.

If one Cineplex theatre in Toronto and another in Langley can have the film why can’t we?

The only theatre selling near Kelowna where I can see on the “Unplanned” website is Towne Cinema in Vernon.

But Vernon is one hour away. Clearly this film is in high demand so why is this happening?

Lynn Jackson

West Kelowna

Seniors are last on council’s agenda

Dear Editor:

Re: “Senior centre must be saved,” by Nancy Goodyer (Okanagan Weekend letters July 13).

As a former member, and I stress former, of the Water Street Seniors’ Group, I wish you all the best in trying to pound into the heads of the mayor and council the fact that your building and group are essential parts of the community.

I think we all know that, say what we may, with one exception, Charlie Hodge who cares, you can’t pound anything into the heads of the mayor and council. You can’t reason with them or help them understand that older buildings housing happy seniors are vital to the overall community.

The demolition of Water Street Seniors’ Centre is a perfect example. This building was home to many happy seniors. They danced, played cards had celebration dinners, just to mention a few of the activities. The callous destruction of that charming old building was a crying shame.

Did the mayor and council listen to the pleas of the seniors? No, they simply ripped the roots out of the senior community and said go to the gymnasium at Parkinson Rec Centre to dance. What a shame.

I agree with Goodyer when she said the space will likely become another “developer moneymaker.” Look at what happened to the land where the Water Street Senior Centre stood. In my opinion, an ugly space-grabbing yacht club.

I’ve found you can talk to the mayor and council until you are blue in the face; they are like a petulant teenager; they want what they want and will get it no matter what.

I’d best get off my soapbox before I trot out that visitor centre fiasco and the concrete canyon called Sunrise Drive, where buildings obliterate our view of the lake and mountains.

Good luck Nancy in your crusade to save the venerable old Okanagan Mission Seniors’ Centre. I am sure there are many out there who feel the same as we do. I urge all of these people to follow this letter with one of their own.

Bill Peckham

Kelowna

Unplanned movie is wildly popular

Dear Editor:

Yesterday I went to Landmark Grande 10 Theatre in Kelowna. I heard they were screening a movie for one week beginning July 12, only to be told that “Unplanned” had been cancelled and I would have to buy tickets through Right to Life organization, who were doing “theatre buy-outs.”

But last night, friends were locked off that site for the third time because the tickets sold out in just four minutes. This is crazy. Right to Life is not set up to sell tickets.

If one Cineplex theatre in Toronto and another in Langley can have the film why can’t we?

The only theatre selling near Kelowna where I can see on the “Unplanned” website is Towne Cinema in Vernon.

But Vernon is one hour away. Clearly this film is in high demand so why is this happening?

Lynn Jackson

West Kelowna