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More than half of all Canadians believe drug treatment should focus on abstinence, rather than opioid replacement therapies, according to poll results released this week.

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A precautionary boil-water notice has been issued for the Ross Road and Brentwood Road areas of West Kelowna and some residents have had their water turned off.

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Canadian political history was made as Prime Minister Justin Trudeau was found guilty for the second time in contravening the Conflict of Interest Act.

On this day, Aug. 15, 1969 — a time of cultural upheaval more tangibly disruptive than that of the current day — more than 400,000 people and 32 musical acts found their way to a dairy farm in New York for “An Aquarian Exposition: 3 Days of Peace & Music.”

Bullet-resistant backpacks are now being sold in major retail stores. The idea is that when the next school shooter opens fire in the hallway, fleeing children who are shot in the back will have a better chance of surviving.

New to the Cowichan Exhibition: Weed. For real. They have added a marijuana contest to September’s fair, giving the valley’s finest amateur dope-growers a chance to strut their stuff, just like the onion-picklers and Holstein-raising 4-H kids.

When Taylor Young made his way off the Anacortes ferry and into a Sidney pharmacy the other day, he paid $300 for insulin that would have cost $2,400 back home in Norman, Oklahoma. “I walked in and said ‘this is how much I want to buy.’ ” Boom. Done.

The hollowing out of the B.C. Interior and the demise of small towns everywhere in the province, particularly those dependent on forestry, has been happening for nearly 30 years.

Three million years ago, a distant ancestor of mine lived in Ethiopia. Since then, we humans have grown taller, stronger, more intelligent and, I would hope, more compassionate.

Two things abhor me. First, the amount of hate-filled violence presently overwhelming our “civilized” society. Second, the incomprehensible fact that some rationalize the violence by appealing to the name of God.

As we approach the October election, one of the significant concerns in British Columbia is the Trans-Mountain pipeline expansion project and by extension the increase in related oil tanker traffic.

Many years ago, the federal government of Canada decided not to allow paid surrogates and “donors,” people who provide their reproductive material to assist someone else to conceive a child.

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Many years ago, the federal government of Canada decided not to allow paid surrogates and “donors,” people who provide their reproductive material to assist someone else to conceive a child.

As we approach the October election, one of the significant concerns in British Columbia is the Trans-Mountain pipeline expansion project and by extension the increase in related oil tanker traffic.

He’s baa-aack. Three months after ranting at a Summerland council meeting about how the media’s coverage of wildfires and floods hurt tourism last year, David Hull was back at it this week.

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Rather than focussing on the noticeable absence of Conservative leader Andrew Scheer from Sunday’s Pride celebration in Vancouver, the real story was the unity of the other three party leaders.

Sometimes, when Janet Austin is stowing her ride at the Government House bicycle lock-up, she’ll be approached by strangers.

Bravo to Prince George city council for its plans to work towards phasing out the use of plastic shopping bags.

Columnist David Bond is on his annual summer break. His column, which ordinarily runs on Tuesdays in The Courier, will return Sept. 3.

A recent decision by the B.C. Employment Standards Tribunal appears to accept, and in some respects even reward, workplace disobedience. The case involved an employee at a dental clinic in Lumby.

Local governments in B.C. have to bring climate change into their long-term planning, but suing fossil-fuel companies to recover costs would be a waste of time and money.

Over the last four weeks I have shared a few of my favorite axioms. An axiom being a statement that is generally thought to be true and which most people believe.

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Initially, when I went looking for a translation of la frenz, I though it would end up to be French, Italian or Spanish for frenzy as in a frenzy of excitement.

It wasn’t just that there was a topless woman playing guitar beside the Denman Island General Store.

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The immediate and strident criticism by Peachland officials of two proposed highway bypass routes is peculiar and likely not in the town’s best interests.

Earlier this month, I visited Welcome House, a place of refuge for people who are new to British Columbia.

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I was born of American parents in Canada. During my formative years, I spent about half of the time in the U.S. I received both my undergraduate and graduate education there before returning to Canada to teach at the University of Western Ontario and UBC, eventually becoming a federal civil …

I recently began a mini-series on axioms. An axiom is a statement that is generally thought to be true and which is often used as a starting point for further dialogue. Bottom line — an axiom is a pithy saying that is self-evident and that most people believe.